The Outdoor Journal

Blue Jays

My grand dad always refer to them as “Jay Birds” . They were common and robbed a lot of corn out of the gallon can he had nailed up in maple tree for a squirrel feeder, and they were pretty bold about it. I'm sure he kind of enjoyed them but he thought they got a lot of the squirrels handouts.

Blue jays numbers have declined in recent years, but still are rated a species of low concern on the continental concern score. Blue Jay populations decreased by about 28% between 1966 and 2015, according to the North American Breeding Bird Survey. 

Blue Jays are found in all kinds of forests but especially near oak trees; they’re more abundant near forest edges than in deep forest. They’re common in urban and suburban areas, especially where oaks or bird feeders are found. According to Cornell’s all about birds. 

If you feed birds, you should know Blue Jays prefer tray feeders or hopper feeders on a post rather than hanging feeders, and they prefer peanuts, sunflower seeds, and suet.

Cornell's website also states:Blue Jays communicate with one another both vocally and with “body language,” using their crest. When incubating, feeding nestlings, or associating with mate, family, or flock mates, the crest is held down; the lower the crest, the lower the bird’s aggression level. The higher the crest, the higher the bird’s aggression level; when a Blue Jay squawks, the crest is virtually always held up. Blue Jays have a wide variety of vocalizations, with an immense “vocabulary.” Blue Jays are also excellent mimics. Captive Blue Jays sometimes learn to imitate human speech and meowing cats. In the wild, they often mimic Red-shouldered and Red-tailed hawks, and sometimes other species.

Trending Video

My Cameron News

BB Highway
P.O. Box 498
Cameron, MO 64429
PHONE: (816) 632-6543
FAX: (816) 632-4508
Email: editor@mycameronnews.com

Privacy Policy
 

Sign Up For Breaking News

Stay informed on our latest news!

Manage my subscriptions

Subscribe to Breaking News feed