Biden Welcomes New Monument Close to Grand Canyon, Emphasizes US Investment
4 mins read

Biden Welcomes New Monument Close to Grand Canyon, Emphasizes US Investment

In a historic step hailed not only for Arizona but for the planet, President Joe Biden signed a national monument designation for the greater Grand Canyon on Tuesday, realizing the enduring aspirations of Native American tribes and environmental advocates. 

Occurring during Biden’s three-state Western tour, this decision aims to safeguard approximately 1,562 square miles (4,046 square kilometers) adjacent to the Grand Canyon National Park, comprising canyons, plateaus, and tributaries vital to diverse flora and fauna. 

These encompass bison, elk, desert bighorn sheep, and even rare cactus species. 

Marking his fifth monument designation, Biden’s move has cultural, environmental, and political implications.

Tribes in Arizona have persistently urged President Biden to leverage his authority under the Antiquities Act of 1906 to establish a new national monument, christened Baaj Nwaavjo I’tah Kukveni. 

For the Havasupai people, “Baaj Nwaavjo” signifies “where tribes roam,” while the Hopi tribe’s “I’tah Kukveni” translates to “our footprints.”

Emphasizing the significance of this action, Biden linked it to his administration’s broader efforts to combat climate change. 

Against the backdrop of extreme heat waves, he noted the preventable loss of lives due to heat, making a compelling case for immediate action.

The President’s speech also resonated with past mistreatment of Native Americans, highlighting the federal government’s commitment to fulfilling treaty obligations and rectifying historical injustices. 

Biden’s comments echoed his repeated criticism of attempts to restrict learning by controlling educational materials.

The political stakes are high, given Arizona’s status as a pivotal battleground state, narrowly won by Biden in 2020. 

This designation assumes greater significance as it strategically aligns with his prospects for a second term.

Related Article: President Biden’s Words On His Son Hunter: A Possible Political Fallout Ahead

Grand Canyon Monument Designation: Tribal Support and Opposition

Biden-monument-grand-canyon-us-investment
In a historic step hailed as not only for Arizona but for the planet, President Joe Biden signed a national monument designation for the greater Grand Canyon on Tuesday, realizing the enduring aspirations of Native American tribes and environmental advocates.

On the ground, tribal leaders and advocates joined the event, signifying the importance of this monument designation to Indigenous communities. 

While the move was celebrated, some opposition remained, particularly from Republican lawmakers and the uranium mining industry operating in the area. 

These opponents argued for economic benefits and national security.

The Interior Department’s establishment of a 20-year moratorium on new mining claims around the Grand Canyon in 2012 responded to concerns about water contamination risks.

Notably, existing mining claims remain unaffected by the designation. 

Moreover, the monument encompasses a small fraction of the nation’s uranium reserves, and alternative accessible resources exist elsewhere.

The Grand Canyon’s designation holds profound meaning, not just as a natural wonder but as a cultural and environmental treasure. 

Arizona Governor Katie Hobbs acknowledged this multi-faceted significance, while President Biden underscored the Grand Canyon’s unparalleled value.

The monument designation, however, sparked opposition from various quarters. Critics questioned its effectiveness in addressing ongoing challenges such as drought and forest management, raising concerns about its impact on wildlife and privately owned land.

The Arizona political landscape has evolved since 2017 when the concept of a monument designation faced resistance from the state’s Republican leaders. 

Now, Democratic leaders like Sen. Mark Kelly and Sen. Kyrsten Sinema have endorsed the move, indicative of changing attitudes towards conservation and environmental protection.

Despite opposition from mining companies, Biden’s move underscores his administration’s commitment to environmental preservation and climate change mitigation. 

This decision is not only symbolic but also carries substantial implications for the millions of Americans who appreciate the Grand Canyon’s natural beauty and its cultural significance to Indigenous communities.

Related Article: Nancy Pelosi’s Social Security Income Revealed: What’s The Amount?

Source: AP News

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *