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Ginni Thomas, Clarence Thomas’ Wife, Texted Mark Meadows About the 2020 Election| Latest News!

About the 2020 Election.

Following the 2020 presidential election, Virginia Thomas, a conservative activist married to Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas,

repeatedly pressed White House chief of staff, Mark Meadows, to pursue unrelenting efforts to overturn the result in urgent text exchanges during crucial weeks following the vote,

according to copies of the messages obtained by chief election and campaign correspondent Robert Costa and Bob Woodward of The Washington Post.

A series of messages between Virginia Thomas, also known as Ginni, and then-President Donald Trump’s top aide reveal an extraordinary pipeline of communication during a period when Trump and his allies were vowing to go to the Supreme Court in an attempt to overturn the election results.

The messages are part of a total of 29 messages obtained. Ginni Thomas used her access to President Donald Trump’s inner circle to encourage and seek to guide the president’s strategy to overturn the election results.

The messages, which do not specifically mention Justice Thomas or the Supreme Court, reveal for the first time just how open and grateful Meadows was to receive her advice.

One of Thomas’ stated goals in the texts was for lawyer Sidney Powell, who had made inflammatory and unproven assertions about the election, to become “the lead and the face” of Trump’s legal team.

Powell had propagated incendiary and unsupported statements about the election.

Meadows gave the House Select Committee probing the attack on the United States Capitol on Jan. 6 with 2,320 text communications, which included the messages.

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This was the first time that the existence of messages between Thomas and Meadows had been publicized, and The Washington Post both conducted investigations into it.

Meadows sent 21 messages, and Thomas sent eight. These conclusions were then validated by five individuals who had access to the committee’s papers.

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