Typhoon Doksuri Forces 31,000 to Flee Homes in Beijing as Heavy Rains Deluge the City
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Typhoon Doksuri Forces 31,000 to Flee Homes in Beijing as Heavy Rains Deluge the City

Beijing experienced a deluge of heavy rainfall, recording the highest precipitation of the year, as Typhoon Doksuri’s remnants passed through the region. This powerful storm compelled over 31,000 people to evacuate their homes in the city, according to state broadcaster CCTV.

The China Meteorological Administration reported that heavy rains persisted in Beijing, as well as in Hebei, Tianjin, and eastern Shanxi, even as Doksuri weakened over northern China. In the southern province of Fujian, the typhoon wreaked havoc over the weekend, causing widespread flooding and displacing hundreds of thousands of residents.

Extreme Rainfall in Beijing

Typhoon Doksuri Forces 31,000 to Flee Homes in Beijing as Heavy Rains Deluge the City, Beijing experienced a deluge of heavy rainfall, recording the highest precipitation of the year, as Typhoon Doksuri’s remnants passed through the region, Photo by Tomasz Sienicki via WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

According to the city’s observatory, overnight rainfall in Beijing reached an average of 140.7mm (5.5in), with the maximum recorded rainfall in the Fangshan area reaching a staggering 500.4mm (19.7in). Forecasts indicated that the southern and western regions would experience even heavier rains early on Monday.

Despite the significant rainfall and the forced evacuations, the state media has not reported any damage or casualties.

As the storm battered the region, more than 4,000 construction sites halted work, approximately 20,000 buildings underwent damage inspections, and several scenic spots in the city were closed to ensure public safety.

Over 180 Flights Canceled, and Hundreds Delayed

Flight Master reports that both airports in the capital canceled more than 180 flights on Monday morning, with hundreds more delayed. Train passengers who were stranded overnight were provided with instant noodles, eggs, ham, and potable water by railroad authorities.

While Doksuri gradually weakened, meteorologists issued warnings about the approaching Typhoon Khanun, which is expected to strike China’s densely populated coast later in the week. Authorities expressed concerns that Khanun could cause further damage to corn and other crops that had already been impacted by Doksuri.

Typhoon Doksuri caused extensive damage after passing through Taiwan and the northern Philippines on its way to China. In the Philippines, a ferry capsized tragically due to rain and strong winds, killing at least 25 people.

Source: The Guardian

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